Friday, June 13, 2014

13:45 — 15:00
Parallel Paper/Common Ground/Panel Sessions

Theme A: Decision Making and Managers

Session 24
Capabilities in an International Context
Session 28
Unconventional Drivers of Strategy
Session 32
Learning, Innovation, and Change

Theme B: Entrepreneurship

Session 49
Family Firms: Individual and Social Identity
Session 51
Nascent Markets and Firms

Theme C: Strategic Human Resources

Session 15
Competitive Heterogeneity: Should I Stay or Should I Go (To This Session)?
15:15 — 16:30
Parallel Paper/Common Ground/Panel Sessions

Theme A: Decision Making and Managers

Session 21
Individuals and Top Management
Session 35
Knowledge, Routines, and Capabilities
Session 39
Cognition and Decisionmaking II

Theme B: Entrepreneurship

Session 43
Stars, Teams and Knowledge Management

Theme C: Strategic Human Resources

Session 14
Rewards & Agency: Incentive to Attend this session

Theme D: Methodology

Session 56
The Methods of Microfoudations
16:30 — 17:00
Coffee Break
17:00 — 19:00
Executive Seminar: Microfoundations in Action

In conjunction with our Special Conference, Copenhagen Business School in cooperation with the CBS Competitiveness Platform, is hosting an Executive Seminar titled Next Generation Companies. This event will engage academics, practitioners, and consultants. The aim is to highlight practical perspectives in the context of emerging new strategic paradigms based on the unprecedented CEO, innovative surprises, and new people-based ways of value creation.
Separate registration for this event is not required and all SMS Conference Attendees will have the opportunity to join without paying a separate registration fee. Copy and paste this link for more information. http://strategyandglobalization.com/event/next-generation-companies-executive-conference/ (see full session details)

19:30 — 22:00
Welcome Reception at CBS, Solbjerg Plads 3

Saturday, June 14, 2014

08:30 — 08:45
Opening of Conference
08:45 — 09:45
Keynote I: Microfoundations of Advantage

Keynote

Richard Rumelt, University of California-Los Angeles

photo of Richard Rumelt

Richard P Rumelt, is the Harry and Elsa Kunin Chair in Business and Society at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, and is a towering figure in the strategy field. Often seen as one of the founders of the resource-based perspective, Richard Rumelt’s research on corporate diversification strategy, the sources of sustainable advantages, and the conceptual and theoretical foundations of strategy has been highly influential. He was one of the first scholars to systematically explore microfoundational issues in strategy. Richard Rumelt was President of the Strategic Management Society in 1995-98. He received the Irwin Prize for his book Strategy, Structure, and Economic Performance. His current research interests center on the dynamics of industry transitions.

(see full session details)

09:45 — 10:15
Coffee Break
10:15 — 11:15
Plenary Panel/Motion: Let it be Resolved that the Individual is the Indispensable Starting Point for Theorizing in Strategy

Session Chair

Jay Barney, University of Utah

photo of Jay Barney

Jay B. Barney is a Presidential Professor of Strategic Management and Pierre Lassonde Chair of Social Entrepreneurship at the University of Utah. He previously served as the Professor of Management and held the Chase Chair for Excellence in Corporate Strategy at the Max M. Fisher College of Business, Ohio State University. His research focuses on how firms can gain and sustain competitive advantages. He has been an associate editor for the Journal of Management, a senior editor for Organization Science, a co-editor at the Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, and has been published in numerous leading publications. In addition to his teaching and research, he presents executive training programs throughout the US and Europe. Jay Barney is an SMS Fellow as well as a Fellow of the Academy of Management. He has received honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Lund, the Copenhagen Business School, and Universidad Pontificia Comillas (Madrid), and has had honorary visiting professor positions in New Zealand and China.

Panelists

Russell Coff, University of Wisconsin-Madison

photo of Russell Coff

Russell Coff is the UW Foundation Chairman Orr Bascom Professor of Strategic Management at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research explores the role of knowledge-based assets in creating and sustaining competitive advantage. Thus, he studies dilemmas associated with human capital such as mobility, retention in M&A, rent appropriation, and organizational design under uncertainty. Russell Coff received his Ph.D. from UCLA and has previously been on the faculty of Emory and Washington Universities. He has served the research community through participation on editorial boards including Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Journal of Management, Organization Science, and Strategic Management Journal. He is currently a co-editor at Strategic Organization. His service to the profession has included chairing the BPS Division of the Academy of Management, the founding chair of the Strategic Human Capital Interest Group at SMS, and on the SMS board, Russell Coff has chaired the membership committee, which seeks to enhance innovation, coordination, and cooperation among interest groups.

Rodolphe Durand, HEC-Paris

photo of Rodolphe Durand

Rodolphe Durand is the GDF-Suez professor of strategy at HEC-Paris. He is the MSc in Strategic Management’s Academic Director. On the aftermath of the crisis, he launched the ‘Society and Organizations’ Research Center at HEC-Paris. Over the past years, he was Visiting Professor at New York University (Stern Business School, Spring 2011), at Cambridge University (Judge Business School, Fall 2011), and at London Business School (in 2013). In 2012, he was Visiting Scholar at Harvard Business School. Rodolphe Durand's primary interests concern the sources of competitive advantage and the interplay between the strategic, social, and institutional determinants of performance. Why do firms supersede rivals? Can organizations alter their environment, at which conditions and what are the consequences? How do norms and reputation influence how markets work? Should firms really innovate or rather conform to established logics? For his work on these questions that integrate research streams from sociology, philosophy, and management, he received the American Sociological Association’s R. Scott Award in 2005, the European Academy of Management/Imagination Lab Award for Innovative Scholarship in 2010, and the Fondation HEC Best Researcher of the Year in 2013. Rodolphe Durand is the author of books: “Organizational Evolution and Strategic Management” (Sage, 2006), “The Pirate Organization” (HBR Press, 2012 with JP Vergne) and “Organizations, Strategy, and Society” (Routledge, 2014). He holds an MSc and PhD from HEC-Paris and an MPhil from La Sorbonne.

Teppo Felin, University of Oxford

photo of Teppo Felin

Teppo Felin is Professor of Strategy at Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. His research focuses on the microfoundations of strategy, organizational capabilities, theory of the firm, aggregation and emergence, complex systems and entrepreneurship. His research has
been published in Organization Science, Research Policy, Academy of Management Review, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, PLOS ONE, Managerial and Decision Economics, Erkenntnis, Academy of Management Annals, Journal of Institutional Economics and other research outlets. He is a co-editor of the journal Strategic Organization. He also serves on several journal editorial boards, including the Academy of Management Review and the Journal of Management. Prior to his academic career, he worked in the venture capital industry (in Munich, German and Amman, Jordan). He was raised in Helsinki, Finland. He has four daughters and resides in Summertown, Oxford.

Michael G. Jacobides, London Business School

photo of Michael G. Jacobides

Michael Jacobides holds the Sir Donald Gordon Chair of Entrepreneurship & Innovation at the London Business School, where he is Associate Professor of Strategy. He has held visiting appointments at Wharton, Harvard Business School, NYU- Stern, has visited Bocconi, U. of Paris and Singapore Management University, and teaches in Columbia for the LBS/Columbia EMBA-Global. He has served on the Global Agenda Council of the World Economic Forum on the Financial System and the Future of Investments, and is a Visiting Scholar with the New York Fed, focusing on changing business models in Financial Services. He studied in Athens, Cambridge, Stanford and Wharton, where he obtained his PhD.

The conference kicks off with the controversial issue of whether micro-foundations in strategy must always involve individuals. Does this unnecessarily hinder research? Is it possible to begin from, e.g., routines? Or, is the argument that only individuals act so compelling that individuals must always be the starting point. This panel will be organized as a set of brief pro and con talks for the motion. (see full session details)

11:30 — 12:45
Parallel Paper/Common Ground/Panel Sessions

Theme A: Decision Making and Managers

Session 22
Exploration and Exploitation
Session 31
Learning and Imitation

Theme B: Entrepreneurship

Session 44
Intrapreneurship and Innovation Management
Session 52
Cognitive Perspectives and Entrepreneurship

Theme C: Strategic Human Resources

Session 10
Human Capital Aggregation: A Level Headed Look
Session 16
Human Capital & Strategy: Surprise Session

Theme D: Methodology

Session 58
Microfoundations, Learning and Dynamics
12:45 — 14:00
Lunch
14:15 — 15:15
Keynote II: How Social Networks Create Competitive Advantage: Hubs, Brokers, and Structural Holes

Keynote

Ronald Burt, University of Chicago

photo of Ronald Burt

Ronald S. Burt is the Hobart W. Williams Professor of Sociology and Strategy at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. His research addresses how social networks create competitive advantage for individuals and organizations. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, was the Academy of Management's 2007 Distinguished Scholar of Organization and Management Theory, and received in 2011 the Academy of Management's George R. Terry award for his book, Neighbor Networks: Competitive Advantage Local and Personal.

Social networks are performance-relevant because they locate a person or team in the sticky-information market of behavior and belief that extends within and across organizations. So called "network brokers" and "network hubs" have advantages of information breadth, timing, and arbitrage, advantages associated with higher compensation, promotion, and recognition relative to peers. However, there are signficant contingencies. Network advantage is associated with stunning achievement for some people, and nothing at all for others. This session is a quick summary of what we know about the mechanism responsible for network advantage and the significant contingencies in its returns. (see full session details)

15:30 — 16:45
Parallel Paper/Common Ground Sessions/Panel Sessions

Theme A: Decision Making and Managers

Session 36
Cognition and Decisionmaking
Session 54
Neuro-foundations of Strategic Decisions

Theme B: Entrepreneurship

Session 46
Institutional Theory, Identity and Entrepreneurship
Session 50
Entrepreneurship and Stakeholder View

Theme C: Strategic Human Resources

Session 9
Stars (So You Want to Be A...)
Session 12
Knowledge & Routines: Learning Disabilities?

Theme D: Methodology

Session 57
Microfoundations and Theory: Next Steps
16:45 — 17:15
Coffee Break
17:15 — 18:15
Showcase Panels
19:30 — 22:30
Conference Dinner at Moltke's Palace

Sunday, June 15, 2014

08:30 — 09:45
Parallel Paper/Common Ground/Panel Sessions
09:45 — 10:15
Coffee Break
10:15 — 11:15
Keynote III: Formation and Obstacles for High Performance Work Systems

Keynote

Ernst Fehr, University of Zurich

photo of Ernst Fehr

Ernst Fehr is one of Europe’s foremost economists. He is a Professor of Microeconomics and Experimental Economic Research and chairman of the Department of Economics at the University of Zürich, Switzerland. He has made seminal contributions to the understanding of the evolution of human cooperation and sociality, in particular fairness, reciprocity and bounded rationality. Ernst Fehr has also made important contributions to the emerging field of neuroeconomics, as well as to behavioral finance and experimental economics. His research has been published in the leading economics journals.

High performance work systems require the simultaneous implementation of various complementary organizational features. They give employees high discretion about their work effort and keep effort monitoring at a minimum.They rely on gift exchange, incentivize employees by the payment of efficiency wages that give employees a rent. Finally, they are based on intensive screening of workers to avoid hiring low performers. Screening is not just based on indicators of skill but also on personality, i.e., employee reputations that signal "cooperative types" are key. These claims are based on clean laboratory evidence that shows the complementarity of (i) high work discretion, (ii) payment of efficiency wages that trigger gift exchange and, (iii) screening based on "personality". If any of these features is absent, performance is much lower indicating the necessity of the simultaneous implementation of these features. (see full session details)

11:30 — 12:30
Plenary Panel: How Much Foresight Should We Assume of Managers in Strategy Research?

Session Chair

Robert Hoskisson, Rice University

photo of Robert Hoskisson

Robert E. Hoskisson is the George R. Brown Chair of Strategic Management at the Jones School of Business at Rice University. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California–Irvine. His research topics focus on corporate strategy and governance and he teaches courses in corporate and international strategic management, among others. He has co-authored over 20 books including Strategic Management: Globalization and Competitiveness (11th Edition), Competing for Advantage (2nd Edition) and Understanding Business Strategy (3rd Edition). He was recently ranked among the top scholars in business and economics by the Times Higher Education for the number of papers with over 50 citations. He has served on the Board of Directors and is currently the Past President and a Fellow of the Strategic Management Society.

Panelists

Jay Barney, University of Utah

photo of Jay Barney

Jay B. Barney is a Presidential Professor of Strategic Management and Pierre Lassonde Chair of Social Entrepreneurship at the University of Utah. He previously served as the Professor of Management and held the Chase Chair for Excellence in Corporate Strategy at the Max M. Fisher College of Business, Ohio State University. His research focuses on how firms can gain and sustain competitive advantages. He has been an associate editor for the Journal of Management, a senior editor for Organization Science, a co-editor at the Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, and has been published in numerous leading publications. In addition to his teaching and research, he presents executive training programs throughout the US and Europe. Jay Barney is an SMS Fellow as well as a Fellow of the Academy of Management. He has received honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Lund, the Copenhagen Business School, and Universidad Pontificia Comillas (Madrid), and has had honorary visiting professor positions in New Zealand and China.

Giovanni Gavetti, Dartmouth College

photo of Giovanni Gavetti

Giovanni Gavetti is an Associate Professor of Business Administration at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. He joined Tuck in 2012. Previously, from 2000 to 2012, he was an Associate Professor at Harvard Business School. He holds a Ph.D. in Management from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. in Economics from Bocconi University. Giovanni Gavetti’s research focuses on the cognitive foundations of strategic leadership. His teaching and consulting have focused on a broad range of strategy topics such as strategic innovation and inertia, behavioral strategy, competitive strategy, and strategy process. He currently teaches Tuck’s core strategy course Competitive and Corporate Strategy, in addition to the elective The Psychology of Strategic Leadership, and a series of executive classes.

Sidney Winter, University of Pennsylvania

photo of Sidney Winter

Sidney G. Winter is the Deloitte and Touche Professor of Management, Emeritus, at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. During his career he has held regular or visiting appointments at seven universities, served on the staffs of the U.S. General Accounting Office, the RAND Corporation and the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers, been a consultant for various governmental and non-profit organizations, and appeared as an expert witness in antitrust and other litigation. With Richard Nelson, he co-authored An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change (1982). His recent research focus has been on the study of management problems from the viewpoint of evolutionary economics. He is an elected fellow of the Econometric Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Sidney Winter is a graduate of Swarthmore College, and received his doctorate in economics from Yale University. He is also a member of the SMS Fellows.

Strategy involves planning, and it is therefore hard to imagine strategy without foresight? However, much foresight should we feature in models and theories of strategic managers? Is such foresight partly context dependent or dependent on the psychology of decision makers? (see full session details)

12:30 — 13:45
Lunch
14:00 — 15:15
Parallel Paper/Common Ground/Panel Sessions

Theme A: Decision Making and Managers

Session 25
Knowledge and Capabilities
Session 29
Identity and Behavior
Session 37
Structure, Interaction, and Roles

Theme B: Entrepreneurship

Session 48
Resource Based View and Entrepreneurship

Theme C: Strategic Human Resources

Session 18
Human Capital & Strategy: Grab Bag (See What You Take Away)

Theme D: Methodology

Session 59
New Approaches to Microfoundations
15:15 — 15:30
Coffee Break
15:30 — 16:45
Parallel Paper/Common Ground/Panel Sessions

Theme A: Decision Making and Managers

Session 26
Dynamics of Strategic Alliances
Session 27
Governance and Top Management Teams
Session 38
Personality, Teams and Cooperative Strategy

Theme B: Entrepreneurship

Session 47
Cognitive Beliefs and Decision Making
Session 60
Entrepreneurial behavior

Theme C: Strategic Human Resources

Session 13
TMT Impact: Leading Indicators
17:00 — 18:00
Plenary Panel: Do CEOs Matter?

Session Chair

Marie Louise Mors, Copenhagen Business School

photo of Marie Louise Mors

Louise Mors is Professor of Strategic and International Management at the Copenhagen Business School. Previously she was on the faculty in Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the London Business School. She completed her PhD in Management at INSEAD in Fontainebleau and also spent time as a post-doc at MIT. Her research examines the relationship between senior managers’ informal networks, organization design, knowledge transfer and innovation. Her work has appeared in the Strategic Management and Academy of Management Journals. Louise Mors currently serves as associate editor of Academy of Management Perspectives. She is also an active member of the SMS, where she previously served as rep at large for the K&I interest group and often serves as a reviewer.

Panelists

Morten Bennedsen, INSEAD

photo of Morten Bennedsen

Morten Bennedsen is the André and Rosalie Hoffmann Chaired Professor of Family Enterprise. He obtained a PhD in economics from Harvard University in 1998, a Master Degree with Distinction from London School of Economics and a Bachelor Degree from University of Copenhagen. His area of teaching includes family business governance, corporate governance, applied microeconomics and firm theory. Morten Bennedsen’s main research area is the governance of family firms and other closely held corporations in a global context. He has done research on family firms, closely held corporations, capital structures, venture capital, investor protection, ownership structures and privatization. His work has been published in top finance and economics journals, such as Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Political Economics, Quarterly Journals of Economics, Journal of Banking and Finance, and Journal of Public Economics. Morten Bennedsen’s research has been cited in many international newspapers including Wall Street Journal, International Herald Tribune, and business newspapers in Germany, Nederland, Portugal, Norway and Denmark.

Sydney Finkelstein, Dartmouth College

photo of Sydney Finkelstein

Sydney Finkelstein is the Steven Roth Professor of Management, and Associate Dean for Executive Education, at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, where he teaches courses on Leadership and Strategy. He holds degrees from Concordia University and the London School of Economics, as well as a Ph.D. from Columbia University in strategic management. Sydney Finkelstein has published 17 books and 75 articles, with several bestsellers, including the #1 bestseller in the U.S. and Japan, Why Smart Executives Fail. Sydney Finkelstein is a Fellow of the Academy of Management, and has had three books nominated for the Academy of Management’s Terry Book Award, the most prestigious such honor in the field. His research focuses on strategic leadership, corporate governance, and creating top talent. He is an active consultant and speaker to executives and boards around the world.

Alison Mackey, University of Utah

photo of Alison Mackey

Alison Mackey is an Assistant Professor of Management at the Orfalea College of Business at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly). She received her PhD in Business Policy and Strategy from Ohio State University. She also holds a MA in Organizational Behavior and a BA in Economics from Brigham Young University. Prior to her appointment on the faculty at Cal Poly, she was on the faculty at Texas A&M University teaching in both the undergraduate and graduate programs there. Her research in the strategic human capital field is currently focused on top executives examining such issues as labor markets, compensation, value creation and value appropriation. Her research has been published in Academy of Management Review and Strategic Management Journal. In 2007 she received the Wiley Blackwell Outstanding Dissertation award from the BPS Division Academy of Management. Currently she serves on the editorial boards at Strategic Management Journal and Journal of Management.

Strategy research typically assumes that CEOs matter, not just as administrators, but also as strategists acting on behalf of the organizations they manage. How warranted is this assumption, really? And if CEOs matter, where exactly is it that they mainly make a difference? (see full session details)

18:00 — 19:30
Farewell Reception at CBS, Kilevej 14a


Strategic Management Society

Copenhagen